K9 D’Jango demonstrates abilities


Highland County Sheriff Donnie Barrera on Tuesday brought deputies and the department’s police dog, D’Jango, to the Hillsboro Rotary Club at the Ponderosa Banquet Center to demonstrate the K9 unit’s abilities. The German Shepherd’s handler, Sgt. Craig Seaman, right, and Deputy Dan Hopkins, left, put D’Jango through his paces as the dog identified drug residue that had been planted, as well as his attack abilities. The four-year-old, $12,000 K9 is a dual purpose dog, capable of both tracking people and identifying drugs.


Gary Abernathy|The Times-Gazette

Highland County Sheriff Donnie Barrera on Tuesday brought deputies and the department’s police dog, D’Jango, to the Hillsboro Rotary Club at the Ponderosa Banquet Center to demonstrate the K9 unit’s abilities. The German Shepherd’s handler, Sgt. Craig Seaman, right, and Deputy Dan Hopkins, left, put D’Jango through his paces as the dog identified drug residue that had been planted, as well as his attack abilities. The four-year-old, $12,000 K9 is a dual purpose dog, capable of both tracking people and identifying drugs.

Highland County Sheriff Donnie Barrera on Tuesday brought deputies and the department’s police dog, D’Jango, to the Hillsboro Rotary Club at the Ponderosa Banquet Center to demonstrate the K9 unit’s abilities. The German Shepherd’s handler, Sgt. Craig Seaman, right, and Deputy Dan Hopkins, left, put D’Jango through his paces as the dog identified drug residue that had been planted, as well as his attack abilities. The four-year-old, $12,000 K9 is a dual purpose dog, capable of both tracking people and identifying drugs.
http://timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_django-rotary-9-27-16.jpgHighland County Sheriff Donnie Barrera on Tuesday brought deputies and the department’s police dog, D’Jango, to the Hillsboro Rotary Club at the Ponderosa Banquet Center to demonstrate the K9 unit’s abilities. The German Shepherd’s handler, Sgt. Craig Seaman, right, and Deputy Dan Hopkins, left, put D’Jango through his paces as the dog identified drug residue that had been planted, as well as his attack abilities. The four-year-old, $12,000 K9 is a dual purpose dog, capable of both tracking people and identifying drugs. Gary Abernathy|The Times-Gazette
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