Second St. traffic talks ongoing


Railroad crossing repairs complete; upcoming events detailed

By Angela Shepherd - [email protected]



At Greenfield council’s Wednesday meeting Debra Crago speaks in favor of a portion of Second Street being open to two-way traffic.


The matter of a portion of Second Street being opened to two-way traffic continued at Wednesday’s Greenfield Village Council meeting.

Those who have an interest in the immediate area and who are pushing for the change spoke to council about safety concerns in regard to the current one-way traffic.

Julia Wise, executive director of the Highland County Community Action Organization Inc., said her concerns are with the Head Start housed in the armory on a corner of Jefferson and Second streets.

As it stands, children have to unload and load on Jefferson Street. To do the same on Second Street would mean the children have to unload and load to and from the buses into Second Street since it only allows for southbound traffic.

Debra Crago and Shari Royse-Bellar, proprietors of Subway, which occupies a property close to the corner of the block in question, echoed these concerns.

Crago spoke of accident reports from all along Jefferson Street. She challenged Greenfield Police Chief Tim Hester’s and Greenfield Public Service Director Brian Smith’s report of the number of accidents that occur on the east end of Greenfield, and that another point of entry onto Jefferson Street would likely not elevate the number of accidents in the area.

Hester’s and Smith’s concerns were read in a report provided to council at its last meeting.

On Wednesday, Hester was present and said that he and Smith looked at crash statistics for the east end of Greenfield only, which is a congested area to begin with and accounts for half of all accidents on Jefferson Street.

The chief and Smith had recommended to council in their previous report that a traffic study should be done prior to any changes being made because changing the traffic flow and the additional traffic the change would invite.

At council’s last meeting it was reported a study would cost the village $10,000.

A resident present Wednesday asked council if there had been any objections from the public for the proposal of that block of Second Street being open to two-way traffic, and council members said there had been none, apart from Hester and Smith’s report.

The legislation to make the block open to two-way traffic and place a sign prohibiting a left-hand turn onto Jefferson was read a second time.

A third reading will occur at council’s next meeting on Oct. 7. Only after the third reading will the legislation be voted on for adoption.

In other business, city manager Ron Coffey reported that two recycling bins will be returned to Greenfield “soon.”

He said that he met with Highland County Recycling Director Jennifer Waterman and they scouted out possible locations in Greenfield for the bins, coming down to North End Sunoco.

The recycling bins previously located at Shopko were removed recently. There are no other public recycling bin locations in Greenfield.

Coffey reported that Luka Papalko of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio will hold a program for the public about energy choices and PUCO services. The program will be held on Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. in the council chambers on the first floor of the Greenfield City Building. The public is invited to attend.

Coffey said it would be a good opportunity for residents to address any questions about “aggregation and other issues relating to utility bills and service.”

On another matter, Joseph Voshall was recommended by Coffey to fill a vacant seat on the recreation commission. Council approved the appointment.

Upcoming events, said Coffey, include Greening Greater Greenfield’s fifth annual Oktoberfest set for Sept. 26. The festivities will begin at 5 p.m. This year, the event will be closer to uptown, with the biergarten in the Walls Insurance parking lot, and activities in the first block of Washington Street and in the City Building courtyard.

The Greenfield Historical Society will host its annual History Day on Oct. 3 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Activities will be at the Grain & Hay Building, Travellers Rest, the B&O Depot, and the Konneker Education Museum, Coffey said.

Coffey also reported that a cleanup day is scheduled for Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. A dumpster will be set up near the railroad tracks across from the Waddell Company on South Washington Street.

Residents can bring trash and other items to dispose of on that day, but they should bring a form of identification showing their residence to be in Greenfield, Coffey said.

While the basic service is free, he said there will be a charge for tires and other materials.

The city manager also reported that crossing improvements along Greenfield’s 29-mile rail spur have been completed as part of the multi-million dollar railroad rehabilitation project that began earlier this year.

The remaining work to be done on the project, according to Coffey, is “work on bridge headwalls, renovation of the bridge over Paint Creek,” as well as surfacing and signal work.

Reach Angela Shepherd at 937-393-3456, ext. 1681, or on Twitter @wordyshepherd.

At Greenfield council’s Wednesday meeting Debra Crago speaks in favor of a portion of Second Street being open to two-way traffic.
http://timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_DebraCrago.jpgAt Greenfield council’s Wednesday meeting Debra Crago speaks in favor of a portion of Second Street being open to two-way traffic.
Railroad crossing repairs complete; upcoming events detailed

By Angela Shepherd

[email protected]

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