Mural to bloom in Spring


Painting can’t begin until temps are warmer

By Angela Shepherd - ashepherd@civitasmedia.com



The beginnings of the mural celebrating Highland County are pictured at the front of the Highland County Administration Building. Completion of the project is expected in the spring when the temperatures are warmer.


The mural in progress at the front of the Highland County Administration Building, begun more than a month ago, likely will not be completed until sometime in the spring.

According to Highland County Commissioner Tom Horst, who is also president of the Highland County Visitor’s Bureau, he has been getting a lot of questions lately from people wondering why the mural is not finished.

Horst said that the wall has to be at a temperature of least 55 degrees before artist Jason Morgan can paint what he has already applied to the wall. He said that the cold temperatures have delayed the completion of the project until the spring.

The beginnings of the mural have been blocked off by a row of orange traffic cones, as Morgan has done all that he can for now.

Morgan started on the mural outlines in early November, Horst said. It is a design that the artist worked on with the Highland County Visitors Bureau, and is something Horst previously referred to as a “collage of the county.” He said the finished three-dimensional painting will look as though it is carved into the concrete.

The completed mural will highlight the county’s agricultural and manufacturing history, and also the various recognizable landmarks located in different towns.

And even though the mural is not yet painted, it is still something interesting to see, as various parts of the county are depicted with identifiable sites from Hillsboro, Greenfield, Highland, Lynchburg, Mowrystown, Leesburg and Sinking Spring.

Morgan is from Yellow Springs, Ohio, Horst said. The artist is responsible for the popular four-story mural on a Main Street building in Wilmington across from the Clinton County Courthouse.

Horst said that the Hillsboro Uptown Renaissance Project has also talked with Morgan about mural painting in other places in uptown Hillsboro.

In recent months, other questions about the mural have arisen, such as people mistakenly believing that the cost is coming from taxpayer money. No funds for the mural are coming from county coffers, said Horst. The mural has been financed solely through the donations of local businesses and individuals.

Horst thanked the donors who have contributed, including Bagshaw Enterprises, Bear Mechanical, Chris Lewis, Don and Ann Fender, Donald E. Fender Realty, First State Bank, Heskett Insurance, Jerry Haag Motors, Marsha Hannah, Merchants National Bank, Michael Priest, Ron Zile, Tim and Deborah Koehl, Tim Priest, Weller’s Heating and Plumbing and Wilmington Savings Bank. Horst and his wife, Maggie, have also contributed to the project.

Reach Angela Shepherd at 937-393-3456, ext. 1681, or on Twitter @wordyshepherd.

The beginnings of the mural celebrating Highland County are pictured at the front of the Highland County Administration Building. Completion of the project is expected in the spring when the temperatures are warmer.
http://timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/web1_Mural.jpgThe beginnings of the mural celebrating Highland County are pictured at the front of the Highland County Administration Building. Completion of the project is expected in the spring when the temperatures are warmer.
Painting can’t begin until temps are warmer

By Angela Shepherd

ashepherd@civitasmedia.com

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